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Frigid Conditions

Use this checklist so you don't miss anything when selling jackets and outerwear

September 2012 By Colleen McKenna
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Here's the thing: We're cold. We know it's only September and that we just listed all the best autumn products in our last issue. But fall rain has started and we're feeling icy toward changing seasons. It only takes one day of running out for a quick bite, getting caught in a thunder storm, arriving back at the office soaked, then having your boss call you in to realize you need to invest in a water-repellent coat. Better yet, multiple coats. For rain, chill, snow and blizzards. Though, to be honest, we just stay wrapped in blankets during blizzards. As Anna Wintour once maybe said, "Unisex blanket dresses are the new fashion must-have." Either that or "Never, ever wear a blanket." Either way, you should probably wear a jacket because even blankets get cold during Northeast winters. Also, refer to this list to ensure you have everything you need for a hot outerwear promotion. Make sure the jacket is:

Long-lasting
Jackets may only be used a few months out of the year, but they need to stay sturdy while on a hanger in the summer or on a freezing body in the winter. According to Jonathan Walther, operations manager for Nucom, New Hope, Minn., top-grain cowhide leather is one of the most durable materials for outerwear. "Leather is a natural material composed of millions of fiber bundles wound together to create strength and durability," he said. "Normally a high-quality Burk's Bay leather jacket will last a lifetime with minimal care." Robert Klein, president of Pella Products Inc., Pella, Iowa, added cotton and poly/cotton blends as other long-lasting wears. "We use a lot of 100 percent cotton duck, which is favored for it long wear, low melting point, and breathable comfort," he said. "We also use polyester/cotton blended fabrics, which are more abrasion-resistant than all cotton, and have a longer lifespan."

Lined
Walther suggested 2 oz. polyester fiberfill bonded between leather and nylon lining as a good layering technique. Klein also mentioned polyester as a good lining. "Our over 100 years of experience have shown us that quilted polyester provides for the best all-around lining for our application," he said. "In many applications, we use Dacron Hollofil polyester batting quilted to either flannel or nylon."

 

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